Exploring Caves In The Cayman Islands

Exploring Caves In The Cayman Islands

Just when you think you have considered every outdoor option that awaits you in the Cayman Islands, you are confronted with still others that will take your breath away. While lying on the beach, all water sports, boating and even submarine-diving are wonderful Cayman Islands pursuits, when was the last time you went hiking through breathtakingly beautiful underground caves? Read on for some great ideas on how to create even more vacation memories.

Cayman Crystal Caves
Perhaps one of the most breathtaking sites in all of the Cayman Islands, Cayman Crystal Caves allows visitors a rare underground glimpse of our shared history. Located amid a lush, green tropical forest in Northside, Grand Cayman, the caves will give you a close-up view of ancient stalactites and stalagmites that have developed over millions of years. The 90-minute tour starts with a journey through a living tropical forest on your way to three underground caves. Here, you’ll come face to face with unique tropical plant and animal life, including air plants, balsam trees, bats and parrots.

The caves are replete with otherworldly formations created by single drops of water stretched out over eternity. In addition, you’ll see remnants of fossilized marine and plant life that indicate clearly that the caves were at one time underwater. Today, though, they are perfect for a walking tour you will never forget.

One thing to remember: Make sure you come outfitted with comfortable clothes and good walking shoes.

Bodden Town Pirates Caves
Not all caves are carved out slowly over time by nature, however. Take a trip to Bodden Town, the Cayman Islands’ original capital, and take a tour of some manmade caves that are illustrations of the islands’ colorful past. This community, located on the southeastern side of Grand Cayman, sits on a living coral reef and natural harbor. Consequently, it was a convenient and effective stopping off point for pirates, and its lush, discreet environment proved a good place to hide pirate booty.

Take the self-guided tour from the lush tropical forest to a mini zoo, to the caves, which allow for exploration. You may even find a few passageways that very few people have ever seen. Many of these caves may have remained undiscovered if it were not for a strong storm that hit the islands in 2004. The next year, a major renovation made these newfound passageways accessible to the public. Now, they are available to visitors for just a small admission fee.

With so much to do above ground in the Cayman Islands, why not spend a little time down under? Take the entire family, wear comfortable clothes, learn about the islands’ history, and have some serious fun.

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  • March 17th, 2017

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